August 21, 2019

Why Taylor Swift Plans To Rerecord All Her Songs

Taylor Swift has a plan to make Scooter Braun’s purchase of her body of work irrelevant: The singer is officially rerecording her masters, according to the a new interview with Tracy Smith on CBS Sunday Morning.

Braun manages Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Demi Lovato, and more, as well as a producer. Earlier this year, Braun made headlines when he purchased Big Machine Records, the company that owns all of Swift’s master recordings of every one of her songs prior to her seventh album Lover. Swift was devastated over the news, and took to social media to express her anger, calling Braun’s move her “worst case scenario.” She accused Braun of “bullying” her over the years, connecting him to that years-long feud with Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, the latter of whom was once his client.

"When I left my masters in Scott [Borchetta of Big Machine Records’] hands, I made peace with the fact that eventually he would sell them. Never in my worst nightmares did I imagine the buyer would be Scooter," Swift wrote in her post on Tumblr. "Any time Scott Borchetta has heard the words ‘Scooter Braun’ escape my lips, it was when I was either crying or trying not to. He knew what he was doing; they both did. Controlling a woman who didn’t want to be associated with them. In perpetuity. That means forever."

Now, however, Swift has told Smith that it is “absolutely” the plan to rerecord her masters. This means that Swift would have new versions of her songs, thus, ideally, making the ones that Braun owns not as important: Fans could choose to purchase Swift’s rerecordings instead of older copies, as could anyone who wishes to use a Swift song in a commercial, movie, or show.

Prior to Swift's confirmation that she would do so, Kelly Clarkson publicly encouraged the idea.

"Just a thought, U should go in & re-record all the songs that U don’t own the masters on exactly how U did them but put brand new art & some kind of incentive so fans will no longer buy the old versions," she wrote on Twitter. "I’d buy all of the new versions just to prove a point."

The interview with Swift and Smith will air Sunday, Aug. 25 at 9 am on CBS.

Refinery29 has reached out to Swift and Braun for comment.

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August 21, 2019

Why Making Netflix’s The Family Helped Director Jesse Moss Understand America In 2019

What if we told you that an extremely private Christian sect believed Donald Trump was chosen by God to rule, and even helped get him elected? What if we said this sect wielded enormous influenc e in governments around the world? What if this wasn’t a conspiracy theory, but a provable phenomenon?

The Family, a shocking six-part documentary series on Netflix, delves into this group, called the Fellowship. Religion writer Jeff Sharlet first heard of the Fellowship after joining Ivanwald, a house in Arlington, VA where young men live, pray, and tend to the Fellowship’s D.C. connections. After witnessing the Fellowship’s blurring of church and state first-hand, Sharlet went full undercover and wrote a book, now turned into a Netflix documentary. Ever since The Family ’s release on August 7, audiences have been reeling about its findings — and what they mean for understanding America’s current political climate.

We spoke to Jesse Moss, the creator of The Family, about casting Oliver Cromwell, Donald Trump as a "Wolf King," and what The Family might illuminate about America in 2019.

Refinery29: What made you want to adapt Jeff Sharlet’s book, The Family, into a series?

Jesse Moss: “The book completely escaped my attention when it came out, though I don’t know how. When I read the book two years ago, I was floored. I couldn't believe it. I was impressed by the reporting and Jeff’s personal experience. Both of those things suggested that there was a challenging but possible way to adapt it as a documentary. What I liked about the project was that it was terrifying to me. The story was terrifying and the challenge of trying to adapt it was terrifying. That’s where the important work is — and what I want to be doing. It was, from that point, about two years start to finish.”

The book came out in 2009. The story has taken on greater urgency now. Netflix has an enormous reach. Why is now the right time for millions to be seeing this story?

“A big motivating question for me in taking on the project was to understand the relationship between the Evangelical Christian right and Donald Trump. How to explain the faithful embrace of someone who’s so seemingly not pious. Is that explained in transactional politics or is that about theology?

“The theology of the Fellowship might explain the moment we find ourselves in. Someone who seems to evoke the worst authoritarian tendencies, and yet seems to have enjoyed the wholehearted embrace of Evangelical voters. That was the answer to the question I thought might be lurking in the story — and that’s what people are responding to, in part.”

What does the theology of the Fellowship help you understand about Donald Trump?

“The idea that leaders are chosen by God. That they are instruments of God’s will. Does the theology of the Fellowship, where you preach to the up and out, and not the down and out, present an inherent challenge to transparency, accountability, and democracy? The Fellowship embraces, and have made an intentional purpose, of reaching out to some of the worst despots, dictators, and murders of the 20th century.

“There’s an argument to be made, and the Fellowship makes it, that you can do more work if you preach to the powerful. They in turn would do more work that would trickle down to the masses. We’ve seen that philosophy as it plays out in economics. Does it work? I think the verdict is pretty clear in in that case.”

I imagine access was a challenge. The documentary features interviews from people in the Fellowship, and its stringent critics. How did you recruit people for interviews?

"When I started the project I sent the Fellowship a clear letter of my intentions: Here’s who I am, here's the work I’ve done. I’d like to know the work that your organization does, I’d like to come over to the Cedars and visit. They wrote back politely, ' No, we do our best work invisibly.' And yet we persist, as we do. We were able to get people around the periphery of the Fellowship to talk. Eventually the Fellowship put forward Larry Ross and former congressman Zach Wamp. Those were really good conversations. Not gotchas.

"The series allows [Fellowship members] to tell both the story of the Fellowship and their involvement in it in their own words. There’s no narration. We’ve allowed these conflicting points of views to come through strongly. We’re trusting our audiences to parse this for themselves and come to their own conclusions about what is the nature of this organization.

The Family starts the way so many stories do: An outsider finds himself in a new situation, and we follow along for the ride. Can you talk about creating those Ivanwald segments? They seem like a warped CW show.

“The easy choice, but the wrong choice, would be to paint Ivanwald like a horror film. But there was an innocence and wholesomeness Jeff’s experience. I wanted the male culture that Jeff found himself in to not be cast in a sinister way — at least initially. We’re going to get to the shadows, but we’re going to bring people in the light way. We made some compressions and consolidations, but Jeff provided a ready-made screenplay for this story.

“David Risdall played the young Jeff. He was raised in an Evangelical family and was very faithful through his 20s. He brought a real sensitivity to the role. James Cromwell, someone who was in both Babe and LA Confidential, came to embody the contradictions of Doug Coe. Is he benevolent or is he sinister? The series works it out and allows the audience to come to their own conclusions.”

How did making this change your perspective on the current moment? There’s so much you can take away from this documentary. What did you?

“Before, I did not intellectually understand a theology that would see people like our current president as instruments of God’s will. But this transcends the story of the Fellowship. We find ourselves on the precipice of a crisis of democracy — the destabilization of Europe and the rise of Christian nationalism and ethnic nationalism. Is faith going to be a bulwark against authoritarianism,or accelerate that moment? That’s the profound question we need to be asking. What’s the role of the faith community? Is it sheltering immigrants who have come to this country illegally, or is it justifying a president whose policies demonize them? How the faith community responds to political leadership and those social challenges is of enormous importance regardless of how you feel about the fellowship itself.

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August 20, 2019

The misguided attacks on ‘This Land Is Your Land’

Some of Guthrie's greatest champions have had difficulties with the song. Al Aumuller/Library of Congress

In recent years, Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” has become a rallying cry for immigrants. And in July, after President Donald Trump tweeted that four Democratic congresswomen of color needed to “go back where they came from,” Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, one of the four targeted, responded with a tweet quoting Guthrie’s lyrics.

But not everyone sees the song as an anthem for inclusion.

In June, the Smithsonian’s online magazine, Folkways, published a piece that lambasted the song for its omissions.

The article, titled “This Land Is Whose Land?,” was written by folk musician Mali Obomsawin, a member of the Native American Abenaki tribe. She wrote of being shaken up “like a soda can” every time she heard the song’s lyrics:

“In the context of America, a nation-state built by settler colonialism, Woody Guthrie’s protest anthem exemplifies the particular blind spot that Americans have in regard to Natives: American patriotism erases us, even if it comes in the form of a leftist protest song. Why? Because this land ‘was’ our land. Through genocide, broken treaties and a legal system created by and for the colonial interest, this land ‘became’ American land.”

Obomsawin’s article immediately generated a flurry of responses from conservative media outlets.

Commie Folksinger Woody Guthrie Not Woke Enough for Mob,” jeered Breitbart’s John Nolte, delighted with this evidence of internecine strife among what he dubbed the “fascist woketards” of the American left. The Daily Wire’s Emily Zanotti soon joined the fray, penning a piece under the headline “This Land Is NOT Your Land: Woke Culture Now Demanding Woody Guthrie Be Canceled Over Folk Music Faux Pas.”

But Obomsawin and her conservative critics might be surprised to learn that some of Guthrie’s greatest champions have also had difficulties with the song.

As the author of three books on Guthrie, I sometimes wonder how the folksinger would respond to the criticism of “This Land Is Your Land” for its omissions.

While we can’t know for sure, a glance at some of his unpublished writings and recently discovered recordings can offer some clues.

Seeger sings a different tune

Pete Seeger, Woody’s colleague and protégé, was perhaps the most responsible for lodging “This Land Is Your Land” in the public consciousness. After Guthrie died in 1967, Seeger continued to perform the song all around the world.

At the same time, Seeger made it clear that he was sensitive to the theft of Native American lands.

In his memoir, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” Seeger recalled an incident during a 1968 performance:

“Jimmy Collier, a great young black singer from the Midwest, was asked to lead [‘This Land Is Your Land.’] Henry Crowdog [sic] of the Sioux Indian delegation came up and punched his finger in Jimmy’s chest. ‘Hey, you’re both wrong. It belongs to me.’ Jimmy stopped and added seriously, ‘Should we not sing this song?’ Then a big grin came over Henry Crowdog’s face. 'No, it’s okay. Go ahead and sing it. As long as we are all down here together to get something done.’”

When performing, Pete Seeger occasionally tweaked the lyrics to ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ Josef SCHWARZ/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Sometimes, in an attempt to ease his conscience when performing “This Land,” Seeger would add a verse penned by the singer and activist Carolyn “Cappy” Israel to acknowledge the theft of Native land:

    This land is your land, but it once was my land
    Before we sold you Manhattan Island
    You pushed my nation to the reservation,
    This land was stole by you from me.

Woody wasn’t oblivious

Was Guthrie himself uncomfortable with the song’s glaring failure to acknowledge the facts of settler colonialism?

There’s no record of his views on the issue. But we do know that he was very aware of – and concerned with – the history of Native American dispossession.

For example, he was angry enough with his cousin, the country singer “Oklahoma Jack” Guthrie, for claiming credit for a song that Woody had written, titled “Oklahoma Hills.” But as Woody wrote in an unpublished annotation to the lyrics, Jack had also left out “the best parts of the whole song” – the names of “the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek and Seminole” who had prior claim to the lands of Oklahoma.

Then there’s a soundbite in a posthumously discovered live recording from 1949:

“They used dope, they used opium, they used every kind of a trick to get these Indians to sign over their lands,” Guthrie says to the crowd.

One of these real estate tricksters was actually Woody’s own father, Charley Guthrie. As biographer and journalist Joe Klein writes in “Woody Guthrie: A Life,” “Because he was able to speak both Creek and Cherokee, Charley became known as especially adept at relieving Indians of their property.”

How did Charley learn these Native tongues? Was it possible that the Guthries had Native ancestors?

In a tantalizingly vague 1950 letter to activist Stetson Kennedy, Woody notes “the rainbow blends” of his own bloodline, including “pure virgin island negro” and unnamed “Indian tribelines.”

And in an unpublished poem entitled “Sweety Black Girl,” written the same year, Guthrie writes:

    my 
    blood beats Spanish and my breath burns Indian and my
    soul boils negro. 

Guthrie admitted that he was ashamed of his father’s disreputable real estate practices. And while he may have idealized his own genealogy, there’s no doubt that he was fully aware of “whose land was whose.”

Native Americans see Guthrie as an ally

Interestingly, not all Native Americans view the song in the same light as Obomsawin.

The song has proved adaptable and malleable enough to enable some Native American artists to work with it.

In 2007, the Anishinaabe songwriter and musician Keith Secola sang his Ojibwa-language version of “This Land” on the album “Native Americana — A Coup Stick.”

Secola said in an interview that his version “reflects a worldview, of being a part of the world and not detached from it. Woody was into people creating their own stories. … That’s what I got from him – how to apply this strategy, this procedure of songwriting, to the topics that affect American Indians.”

A few years before Secola’s cover, two of Guthrie’s previously unpublished songs – “Indian Corn Song” and “Mean Things Happenin’ in This World” – were recorded by the Navajo siblings, Klee, Clayson and Jeneda Benally.

“We wanted to keep the spirit of Woody Guthrie alive,” Clayton said in a 2012 interview. “He wrote songs about the Dust Bowl and unions, but he also wrote about American Indian issues.”

Clayson noted that “Indian Corn Song” was one of his favorite songs to play, because in it Guthrie “talks about wastefulness and how Indigenous people are … living off the planet in a balanced way.”

Mali Obomsawin might take heart from Secola, the Benally siblings and the other artist-activists who have adopted and adapted “This Land Is Your Land.”

Woody Guthrie might not have been perfect, they say, but we don’t need to “cancel” him.

We’ll work with him instead.


“Sweety Black Girl” and unpublished Woody Guthrie correspondence and annotations, words by Woody Guthrie © Copyright Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc., all rights reserved, used by permission.

[ Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter. ]

The Conversation

Will Kaufman has received funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Broadcast Music Industry (BMI) Foundation.

August 20, 2019

The misguided attacks on ‘This Land Is Your Land’

Some of Guthrie's greatest champions have had difficulties with the song. Al Aumuller/Library of Congress

In recent years, Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” has become a rallying cry for immigrants. And in July, after President Donald Trump tweeted that four Democratic congresswomen of color needed to “go back where they came from,” Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, one of the four targeted, responded with a tweet quoting Guthrie’s lyrics.

But not everyone sees the song as an anthem for inclusion.

In June, the Smithsonian’s online magazine, Folklife, published a piece that lambasted the song for its omissions.

The article, titled “This Land Is Whose Land?,” was written by folk musician Mali Obomsawin, a member of the Native American Abenaki tribe. She wrote of being shaken up “like a soda can” every time she heard the song’s lyrics:

“In the context of America, a nation-state built by settler colonialism, Woody Guthrie’s protest anthem exemplifies the particular blind spot that Americans have in regard to Natives: American patriotism erases us, even if it comes in the form of a leftist protest song. Why? Because this land ‘was’ our land. Through genocide, broken treaties and a legal system created by and for the colonial interest, this land ‘became’ American land.”

Obomsawin’s article immediately generated a flurry of responses from conservative media outlets.

Commie Folksinger Woody Guthrie Not Woke Enough for Mob,” jeered Breitbart’s John Nolte, delighted with this evidence of internecine strife among what he dubbed the “fascist woketards” of the American left. The Daily Wire’s Emily Zanotti soon joined the fray, penning a piece under the headline “This Land Is NOT Your Land: Woke Culture Now Demanding Woody Guthrie Be Canceled Over Folk Music Faux Pas.”

But Obomsawin and her conservative critics might be surprised to learn that some of Guthrie’s greatest champions have also had difficulties with the song.

As the author of three books on Guthrie, I sometimes wonder how the folksinger would respond to the criticism of “This Land Is Your Land” for its omissions.

While we can’t know for sure, a glance at some of his unpublished writings and recently discovered recordings can offer some clues.

Seeger sings a different tune

Pete Seeger, Woody’s colleague and protégé, was perhaps the most responsible for lodging “This Land Is Your Land” in the public consciousness. After Guthrie died in 1967, Seeger continued to perform the song all around the world.

At the same time, Seeger made it clear that he was sensitive to the theft of Native American lands.

In his memoir, “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” Seeger recalled an incident during a 1968 performance:

“Jimmy Collier, a great young black singer from the Midwest, was asked to lead [‘This Land Is Your Land.’] Henry Crowdog [sic] of the Sioux Indian delegation came up and punched his finger in Jimmy’s chest. ‘Hey, you’re both wrong. It belongs to me.’ Jimmy stopped and added seriously, ‘Should we not sing this song?’ Then a big grin came over Henry Crowdog’s face. 'No, it’s okay. Go ahead and sing it. As long as we are all down here together to get something done.’”

When performing, Pete Seeger occasionally tweaked the lyrics to ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ Josef SCHWARZ/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Sometimes, in an attempt to ease his conscience when performing “This Land,” Seeger would add a verse penned by the singer and activist Carolyn “Cappy” Israel to acknowledge the theft of Native land:

    This land is your land, but it once was my land
    Before we sold you Manhattan Island
    You pushed my nation to the reservation,
    This land was stole by you from me.

Woody wasn’t oblivious

Was Guthrie himself uncomfortable with the song’s glaring failure to acknowledge the facts of settler colonialism?

There’s no record of his views on the issue. But we do know that he was very aware of – and concerned with – the history of Native American dispossession.

For example, he was angry enough with his cousin, the country singer “Oklahoma Jack” Guthrie, for claiming credit for a song that Woody had written, titled “Oklahoma Hills.” But as Woody wrote in an unpublished annotation to the lyrics, Jack had also left out “the best parts of the whole song” – the names of “the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek and Seminole” who had prior claim to the lands of Oklahoma.

Then there’s a soundbite in a posthumously discovered live recording from 1949:

“They used dope, they used opium, they used every kind of a trick to get these Indians to sign over their lands,” Guthrie says to the crowd.

One of these real estate tricksters was actually Woody’s own father, Charley Guthrie. As biographer and journalist Joe Klein writes in “Woody Guthrie: A Life,” “Because he was able to speak both Creek and Cherokee, Charley became known as especially adept at relieving Indians of their property.”

How did Charley learn these Native tongues? Was it possible that the Guthries had Native ancestors?

In a tantalizingly vague 1950 letter to activist Stetson Kennedy, Woody notes “the rainbow blends” of his own bloodline, including “pure virgin island negro” and unnamed “Indian tribelines.”

And in an unpublished poem entitled “Sweety Black Girl,” written the same year, Guthrie writes:

    my 
    blood beats Spanish and my breath burns Indian and my
    soul boils negro. 

Guthrie admitted that he was ashamed of his father’s disreputable real estate practices. And while he may have idealized his own genealogy, there’s no doubt that he was fully aware of “whose land was whose.”

Native Americans see Guthrie as an ally

Interestingly, not all Native Americans view the song in the same light as Obomsawin.

The song has proved adaptable and malleable enough to enable some Native American artists to work with it.

In 2007, the Anishinaabe songwriter and musician Keith Secola sang his Ojibwa-language version of “This Land” on the album “Native Americana — A Coup Stick.”

Secola said in an interview that his version “reflects a worldview, of being a part of the world and not detached from it. Woody was into people creating their own stories. … That’s what I got from him – how to apply this strategy, this procedure of songwriting, to the topics that affect American Indians.”

A few years before Secola’s cover, two of Guthrie’s previously unpublished songs – “Indian Corn Song” and “Mean Things Happenin’ in This World” – were recorded by the Navajo siblings, Klee, Clayson and Jeneda Benally.

“We wanted to keep the spirit of Woody Guthrie alive,” Clayton said in a 2012 interview. “He wrote songs about the Dust Bowl and unions, but he also wrote about American Indian issues.”

Clayson noted that “Indian Corn Song” was one of his favorite songs to play, because in it Guthrie “talks about wastefulness and how Indigenous people are … living off the planet in a balanced way.”

Mali Obomsawin might take heart from Secola, the Benally siblings and the other artist-activists who have adopted and adapted “This Land Is Your Land.”

Woody Guthrie might not have been perfect, they say, but we don’t need to “cancel” him.

We’ll work with him instead.


“Sweety Black Girl” and unpublished Woody Guthrie correspondence and annotations, words by Woody Guthrie © Copyright Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc., all rights reserved, used by permission.

[ Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter. ]

The Conversation

Will Kaufman has received funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Broadcast Music Industry (BMI) Foundation.

August 20, 2019

Bachelor In Paradise Season 6, Episode 5 Recap: You Spin Me Right ’Round

The last episode of ABC's Bachelor in Paradise left us literally in the middle of a physical fight. A physical fight that started because of a piñata. Jordan Kimball decided to knock down the piñata Christian Estrada had set up for Nicole Lopez-Alvar, which then led to them pushing each other back and forth...

And this is where August 19's episode begins. After the pushing escalates, Jordan throws Christian off of one of those daybed platform things and they continue trying to fight each other on the beach. At this point, security rushes in to pull them off each other. Jordan moves away from the situation with no problem, but Christian breaks free and tries to run back to Jordan. Twice. Of course, the, like, eight security guards catch him easily. Christian also takes off his shirt while security is walking him away, because men.

The show handles things very swiftly after this, both from a production standpoint and the edit of the aftermath we see on the show, and it's very well done. A producer and Chris Harrison sit down with Jordan and Christian separately and tell them that there is a zero tolerance policy for physical altercations, so they both have to go. (Thank goodness. If you ask me, there was no one to root for here.) Chris Harrison lets the cast know the duo are leaving, and they give some commentary that makes it sound like they're fighting in a war. "We had to send two men home," Nicole says, dramatically. Well, they served their time.

Speaking of Nicole, with Christian out of the picture, she finds comfort in Clay Harbor once again. She wanted a man who would be more aggressive in pursuing her, she says of the fight, "but not like this." Nicole and Clay kiss on a daybed next to what appears to be an unacknowledged plate of petit fours. All is well.

Also with Jordan and Christian gone, now only two men are set to leave at the rose ceremony. The rose that is most up in the air is Hannah Godwin's, which is either going to Dylan Barbour or to Blake Horstmann. Dylan tries to woo Hannah with a cheese plate and a bowl of gummy worms. Blake tries to woo her by saying, "Tonight I want to remind you why you have a little bit of a crush on me" and... brings out a mariachi band. They dance, which is Blake's ~move~. Blake and Hannah start making out, right where Dylan can see them. "Everyone’s like, 'Don't watch,'" says Dylan. "I'm like, 'I need to see it.'" He cries.

Before the rose ceremony begins, Onyeka Ehie announces that she'll be leaving. As she says in her confessional, "I just feel like I've been passed by by every person here ... The same girls are going on the same dates." That really sucks. It also sucks that this is hard for her to the point where she feels she can't just chill on the beach and drink margaritas with Wells Adams. You can tell the pressure really got to her.

With this revelation, now three guys are going home. The couples go as follows: Demi Burnett and Derek Peth, Katie Morton and Chris Bukowski, Nicole and Clay, Caelynn Miller-Keyes and Dean Unglert, Tayshia Adams and John Paul Jones, Sydney Lotuaco and Mike Johnson, Hannah and Dylan, and Kristina Schulman and Blake. What.

First of all, with Hannah and Dylan, it's immediately like he wasn't crying over watching her make out with Blake 30 minutes ago. Everyone is happy about her decision.

Second of all, the cast is shook about Kristina and Blake. Why would she choose Blake? Does she really think he deserves a second chance at love like she says?

Well, after the ceremony she goes up to Blake and says, "Welcome to your personal hell, because you're going to be here to watch [Dylan and Hannah]." Wow. This is like when she asked Blake on a date and told the camera, "I'm going to make him my bitch."

Like, it's actually like that, because neither situation ends up being as dramatic as it seems. Kristina clarified on Twitter that she thought Blake should stay and just likes giving him shit. Oh, well. Kristina is doing what she can to make this show interesting. I'll take it.

By the way, Wills Reid, Kevin Fortenberry, and AlwaysBeCam are the ones to leave. Cam says "Always Be Crying" as he makes his exit.

The next day, a new lady enters Paradise. She's Caitlin Clemmens from Colton Underwood's season and she has a date card. Because he's the most single of them all, she asks Blake to go. In what has to be the greatest moment of the night, Blake reveals that he met Caitlin at Stagecoach too! Are you k-id-ing me? He says they didn't hook up, but damn! Please, bring out more contestants who were at Stagecoach. Never let this end.

Caitlin and Blake go to do tantric yoga (you know, for extra closeness) and he fills her in on everything that's happened with him so far in Paradise. It's a lot in the amount of stuff that's gone down and a lot for a person to take in. Caitlin is basically like, okay, whatever, dude, I just got here so let's go make out in the pool.

In his confessional, Blake says of the drama he had with four women that was directly caused by his own actions, "I'm ready to forgive myself." Blake feels he's been hard on himself, and I actually agree. He's been hard on himself by making himself one of the victims in this, when that wasn't necessary and he could have just moved on. The women said their piece about him and that was that. All he had to do was the same thing, but — and I'm taking things back into the real world for a minute — he didn't.

Moving away from that mess, Dylan gets a date card and takes Hannah and finally gets to have some alone time with her that isn't full of tears and the threat of Hannah and Blake breaking into dance. He confesses that he's falling in love with her and she says she's "all in." It's really pretty cute, and I guess I ship them now?

Photo: Courtesy of ABC.

Back at the beach, Katie and Chris are being all flirty and cute. He thinks his sixth Bachelor show might really be the charm. And Tayshia and John Paul Jones are also all flirty and cute. He can't believe a woman as beautiful as her is giving him the time of day, and even says he's starting to fall in love with her. She calls their connection "bizarre," but she's into it. Meanwhile, I haven't forgotten how in the trailer for the full Bachelor In Paradise season he's shown rubbing sunscreen all over Haley "Twin" Ferguson's butt! What's that about, John Paul Jones?

The final act of this episode is all about Demi. Former Bachelorette Hannah Brown arrives to talk to her friend, and, one would think, bring some news about the woman Demi's been seeing back home and who we already know is going to appear on the show. But instead, Hannah and Demi just talk about how things are going. Basically, Demi still has feelings for the woman she's dating, but also really likes Derek.

Then, she goes to talk to Derek, and, one would think, share some news with him about how she feels. But instead, it's just the same thing she's been saying all along about liking him and liking the woman. And as he has been all along, Derek is chill and says he just wants to spend whatever time with her he can.

The cast is all wondering what's happening. Why is Hannah Brown there? What did she tell Demi? What did Demi tell Derek? And the answer is... nothing.

At least not yet. The episode ends with a producer saying, "Demi would like to see Chris Harrison." Presumably, this will be her asking for the woman, who she names as "Kristian," to come down to Paradise, but, man, are they dragging this out. At least Hannah B. seems to have gotten a post-Jed Wyatt trip to Mexico out of this. I hope she spent the rest of the time chilling on a beach with a frozen drink. Just not this beach.

Losers of the Night: Christian, Jordan, Blake

Winners of the Night: Dylan, Hannah B, Stagecoach

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