October 20, 2018

Amritsar train tragedy: 61 lives lost, Railway official calls it case of trespassing – Economic Times

Economic TimesAmritsar train tragedy: 61 lives lost, Railway official calls it case of trespassingEconomic TimesAt least 61 people were killed and 72 injured when a crowd of Dussehra revellers that had spilled onto railway tracks while watching burning...
October 20, 2018

HTC’s standalone Vive Focus will soon get 6DoF VR controllers

While Facebook's Oculus Quest won't arrive until the spring of 2019, its seemingly beefier inside-out tracking plus 6DoF controllers may already pose a threat to HTC's Vive Focus, as well as to other Vive Wave-based standalone VR headsets -- includin...
October 20, 2018

When women got pills for hysteria and advice to keep vaginas clean

A Royal College of Nursing exhibition charts the strange, sometimes disturbing history of women's healthcare.
October 20, 2018

Newfound species of ancient piranha-like fish would have made a meal of you, very slowly

It goes without saying that you could find some pretty dangerous animals if you were to travel back in time tens of millions of years ago, but not all of the creatures that lurked in prehistoric times were dramatically different from what we can still find on Earth today. A newly-discovered species of ancient fish that swam Earth's waters roughly 150 million years ago actually doesn't look all that different from some that still exist today, but that doesn't mean you'd ever have wanted to take a swim with them. The species has been named Piranhamesodon pinnatomus, and if you couldn't tell from its name, it was a lot like a piranha. The fish, which was found in German, would have lived during the late Jurassic period. That means it would have been around at roughly the same time as some pretty iconic dinosaurs, like the allosaurus, stegosaurus, and brachiosaurus, but the animal itself was not a dinosaur. What it was, however, was a pretty serious nuisance for fellow fish. The researchers that discovered the species — whose work is published in Current Biology — found what they believe are some of the fish's victims nearby. Rather than being torn apart and feasted on, the prey fish weren't outright killed. Instead, the sharp-toothed predator apparently nibbled away at their fins, allowing them to regrow before biting away once again. "This is an amazing parallel with modern piranhas, which feed predominantly not on flesh but the fins of other fishes," Dr. David Bellwood, a co-author of the research, said. "It's a remarkably smart move as fins re-grow; a neat renewable resource." Piranhas tend to be portrayed as bloodthirsty beasts that swarm to attack anything that comes close, but the reality is that most of the time the carnivorous fish take small meals whenever they can. This new discovery would seem to suggest that the same was true of similar fish going back 150 million years. Maybe time doesn't change that much after all?
October 20, 2018

Netflix cancels ‘Luke Cage’ a week after dropping ‘Iron Fist’

When Marvel and Netflix announced Iron Fist wouldn't return for a third season, there were reports Luke Cage was close to being renewed. That is not the case, however, as they announced tonight that the show will end after two seasons. In a statement...
October 20, 2018

Saudi claims that Khashoggi died in a ‘brawl’ draw immediate skepticism – Washington Post


Washington Post

Saudi claims that Khashoggi died in a 'brawl' draw immediate skepticism
Washington Post
Claims by the government of Saudi Arabia that Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi died in a physical altercation inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul drew immediate skepticism and contradicted earlier dueling accounts from Saudi and Turkish ...
Trump, Breaking With US Intelligence, Appears to Accept Saudi Explanation of Journalist's DeathNew York Times
Mohammed bin Salman's inner circle takes the blame for Khashoggi's deathCNN
Saudi's Khashoggi death investigation leaves questionsNBCNews.com
Bloomberg -Daily Beast -The Guardian
all 1,063 news articles »
October 20, 2018

US poised to pull out of nuclear arms treaty with Moscow: source – Fox News

Fox NewsUS poised to pull out of nuclear arms treaty with Moscow: sourceFox NewsAn administration official confirmed on Friday that during his meetings next week with Russian officials, National Security Adviser John Bolton will inform Russia that the ...
October 20, 2018

The days of Google letting device makers install its apps for free in Europe are almost over

It looks like Google is going to potentially start making bank by licensing out its app suite to Android handset makers in Europe. That's according to documents obtained by The Verge, which show how in response to a major anti-trust ruling against Google from the European Union this summer, the company is starting to rework the terms of how its Android OS is distributed within the EU. The ruling barred Google from mandating that phone makers bundle Google's Chrome and search applications with the rest of its app suit. Google, according to the documents, is essentially saying, okay -- we'll break out our apps from the OS, license out the app suite and charge as many as $40 per device for the privilege of obtaining that license. The license fee, it should be pointed out, varies from country to country and by phone type, with that $40 representing the top end. It also should be noted that Google might agree to cover at least some of the license cost if the handset makers go on and install Chrome and search as well, along with the rest of the app bundle. The new fees would apply to devices activated on or after February 1 of next year. From The Verge: "The European Commission ruling does not explicitly require Google to charge licensing fees, but Google is required to break apart its traditional bundle of apps. The court ruled that by bundling search and Chrome within Android, Google stifled innovation and cut off opportunities for device makers to sign better deals around preinstalled browsers and search engines ... The commission sees this breakup as a way to increase competition, which could lower costs or add more options for consumers in the long run." That piece goes on to note that Google's Chrome browser and search engine generate hefty profits for the company, so you can see why giving device manufacturers an option to leave them off the device has led to Google feeling like it needs to pursue a per-device fee to fund the distribution of its other apps and services. Most manufacturers may well decide they need Google's Play Store on their device, because customers expect plenty of non-Google apps like Instagram and Snapchat for which the Play Store is the easiest distribution channel on Android. Which may lead those same manufacturers to say fine, we'll pay. Will the extra fees trickle down to consumers in the form of higher device prices? It's likely. Android became so dominant in part because Google gave it away for free to get it onto as many devices as possible. This could slow that pace of adoption down just a tad bit, but Google's well-oiled money-making engine -- well, don't expect that to slow down anytime soon.
October 20, 2018

One culture, two generations: Learning my mother tongue

Lola is the first born British-Nigerian in her family. In this candid conversation she asks her mum why she was never taught their mother tongue.
October 20, 2018

Deaf dance troupe House of Krip seek to change perceptions

The House of Krip vogue dance troupe is challenging perceptions of deaf and disabled people.